Luis Moreno Ocampo, former chief prosecutor of the ICC interviewed by RNW
Luis Moreno Ocampo, former chief prosecutor of the ICC interviewed by RNW
Film still from the video

Young Kenyans firing questions at Ocampo

RNW has offered young Kenyans the chance to ask questions to Luis Moreno Ocampo, former chief prosecutor of the ICC. The candid, crowd-sourced interview has made headlines in Kenya.
"Did the Office of the Prosecutor bribe any witnesses?”, “What do you say to Kenyans who feel resentment towards you?”, “Did your eyebrows give you a sense of seriousness as a prosecutor?” Young Kenyans seized the opportunity to address Luis Moreno Ocampo.

RNW put 32 of the most pressing questions to Ocampo in his first media interview on the Kenyan trials since leaving the ICC. It provoked a firestorm in the Kenyan media and on social media.

Almost 400 comments came in after RNW invited followers to share any questions they had for Luis Moreno Ocampo, former chief prosecutor of the ICC. It was clear from the call that young Kenyans were seeking information about the trials facing their current president and deputy president at the ICC. Some questions were big: about his role in bringing perpetrators to justice. Others light-hearted: about the possible effect of his prominent eyebrows on his standing.

Almost 400 comments came in after RNW invited followers to ask the questions they always wanted to put to Ocampo.

Crowd-sourced
In late January 2014, at a hotel in Amsterdam, RNW fired the questions at Ocampo, who was willing to answer them all. This yielded a candid crowd-sourced 25-minute video interview. Straight after it was published, the video made headlines in the Kenyan mainstream media and social media. It also brought debates about the role of the ICC back to the front page.

Ocampo Exclusive: The first ICC prosecutor talks about the Kenyan trials

Surprising
Eric Beauchemin, project manager of The Hague Trials Kenya and initiator of the interview, hoped the production would contribute to the ongoing dialogue between Kenyans affected by the violence in their country and the officials responsible for justice.

“Giving the Kenyans among our 100,000 Facebook the chance to put their questions for Ocampo was just the the most logical thing to do. It was very interesting and surprising to see which questions they came up with,” Beauchemin said.

It still is a real subject in Kenya, there still is a hunger for this kind of material.

Polarised media
“RNW wants to help Kenyans understand how the Kenya cases work, something they hardly can do by following Kenyan mainstream media, which are very polarised,” explained Beauchemin, who travelled to Kenya with Ocampo in May 2010. “It still is a real subject in Kenya. There still is a hunger for this kind of material.”

Answering questions was part of Ocampo’s new mission to educate young people, as he explains in the interview: “The only thing I want to do now in my next ten years… is to help teachers around the world to educate on peace and justice. We have a new generation coming. They are born in a global world, and they have to be educated on the connection between crimes affecting Kenya or if you live in San Diego or Washington or The Hague.”

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